Dr. Uri Tabori and his colleagues published two papers targeting the PLGA population.  The first focuses on the long-term impact of radiation therapy on PLGG patients and the second evaluates the progression of certain PLGG patients to transformation to secondary high grade gliomas.

As researchers turn their attention to studying PLGA, discoveries are being made.  Most recently, Dr. Uri Tabori, Sick Children’s Hospital in Toronto, Canada, and his colleagues published two papers targeting the PLGA population.  The first focuses on the long-term impact of radiation therapy on PLGG patients and the second evaluates the progression of certain PLGG patients to transformation to secondary high grade gliomas.

Radiation Therapy is associated with increased late mortality in long-term adult survivors of childhood LGG

This article evaluated the long term risk factors and impact of radiotherapy on children and adult survivors of childhood low grade glioma.  Collecting data from the Canadian database of over 3000 patients, this team collected long-term follow up information for PLGG patients diagnosed in Canada from 1985 – 2012 and determined factors affecting their long-term survival.

BRAF Mutation and CDKN2A Deletion Define a Clinically distinct subgroup of childhood secondary high grade glioma

While the majority of PLGG patients remain in the low-grade category, there are a small sub-population that morph into high-grade status (sHGG).  The purpose of this study was to uncover the genetic events leading to the transformation of plug to secondary high grade glioma.  Using a patient base of almost 1000 patients, Dr. Tabori and his colleagues have identified a clinically distinct subtype of sHGG that will help predict the evolution of the LGG patient. This provides an opportunity for increased targeted therapies to mitigate the outcome.